Our performance audits

Addressing issues of public concern

Performance audits are in-depth assessments of whether government agencies are achieving value for money.

A performance audit may cover:

  • the whole of an agency’s operations
  • one particular agency’s activity
  • an activity across a number of agencies.

We report the results of these audits to the CEO of each agency, the responsible minister, the Treasurer and parliament.

When selecting and scoping topics, we combine our own research with suggestions from parliamentarians, agency CEOs and members of the public. We aim to choose topics that reflect the interests of parliament in holding the government to account.

Our three-year program is published on our website and is reviewed annually to ensure it continues to address significant issues of interest to parliament, aligns with government priorities, and reflects contemporary thinking on public sector management. For a full overview of our three-year performance audit program, including proposed audit topics over the next 12 months, see 'The year ahead for performance audit'.

Twelve months after a performance audit is tabled, parliament’s Public Accounts Committee (PAC) examines whether agencies have implemented recommendations from performance audits and whether any changes in practice or performance have occurred in response to these audits.

In some cases, the PAC will hold a public hearing and invite the agency and the Auditor-General to attend and answer questions. Read more on our work with the Public Accounts Committee.

This year’s performance audits

Identifying Productivity in the
Public Sector

Transferring Out-of-Home Care to Non-Government Organisations
Sydney Metropolitan Bus Contracts
Identifying Productivity in the Public Sector

 

This report examined selected areas of government activity to see if sufficient information was available to identify and assess changes in productivity. Productivity is commonly defined as the amount of output per unit of input.

Despite its importance, productivity trends in the public sector are not well understood or reported to parliament. All of the agencies examined had an understanding and reported on the input, output and quality indicators that could be used to track their productivity. However, they did not track productivity and they did not have clear guidance or direction about how this information could be used to measure productivity.

Using our methodology, we found that from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2013 productivity for secondary school education decreased, while productivity improved for public hospital acute inpatient care and the NSW Police Force.

The NSW Local Court also had improved productivity from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2014. Productivity trends could not be identified for primary school education and CityRail.

Agencies better understood and reported on efficiency, which helps agencies to understand the impact of changing costs by measuring cost per unit of output. The available data showed that efficiency declined for acute inpatient care, the NSW Police Force and primary and secondary school education from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2013. At CityRail and the NSW Local Court, efficiency improved from 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2013 and 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2014, respectively.

In the agencies we examined, the NSW Government’s 2011 wages policy was more effective in suppressing employee expense growth than the 2007 wages policy.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • NSW Health
  • Department of Education and Communities
  • Transport for NSW
  • NSW Police Force
  • Department of Justice
  • NSW Treasury
financial report
Agency response

The audited agencies recognised the importance of measuring and reporting productivity and efficiency. Some accepted the recommendations, while others indicated they would consider them in the context of continuous improvement efforts. Some agencies also pointed out methodological difficulties in measuring public sector productivity.

Report release date
16 July 2015
Transferring Out-of-Home Care to Non-Government Organisations

This audit assessed how well the Department of Family and Community Services has transferred the management of children in out-of-home care to nongovernment organisations (NGOs).

The department has put considerable effort into developing the out-of-home care sector and is progressing well towards its goal of transferring all children in statutory care to NGOs. Since 2011, the number of children with an accredited NGO has more than doubled. This is a positive outcome as children are more likely to receive quality care because these providers meet NSW standards for out-of-home care.

However, it is difficult to assess whether overall outcomes for children in care have improved. This is because the department has yet to determine what wellbeing outcomes it wants to achieve, such as improvements in a child’s health, education and welfare. The department is currently developing a quality assurance framework which will include such outcomes. We also found that the number of children in care returned to their birth family has declined, and the number of adoptions has remained relatively unchanged.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Department of Family and Community Services
Carer
Agency response
The Department of Family and Community Services was broadly supportive of recommendations in the report
Report release date
2 September 2015
Sydney Metropolitan Bus Contracts

All scheduled bus services in the Sydney metropolitan area are provided under contracts with public and private operators. The contracts allow Transport for NSW to determine what bus services are provided and to whom. This audit assessed the effectiveness of Transport for NSW’s design and management of these contracts.

Bus services provided under the Sydney Metropolitan Bus Service Contracts have largely been effective and efficient. Operators are mostly meeting their key performance indicators. Customer satisfaction is better than under the previous contracts and improving, patronage is increasing, and the unit costs of providing services are now lower than under the previous contracts.

However, punctuality remains a problem. Private operators are mostly starting their trips on time, but rarely meeting their mid and end-of-trip targets. State Transit Authority’s punctuality is improving but is worse than private operators, and other areas of performance are generally below private operators.

The current situation is a substantial improvement over what we found in our 2010 audit on the previous contracts.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Transport for NSW
bus shelter
Agency response
Transport for NSW was broadly supportive of recommendations in the report.

Report release date
9 September 2015
Community Housing
Albert ‘Tibby’ Cotter Walkway
Activity Based Funding Data Quality

Community Housing

The Department of Family and Community Services has worked collaboratively with community housing providers and industry groups to develop the community housing sector. Although there have been some delays, it has managed the transfer of public housing reasonably well and has improved the sustainability of the sector. The department is close to achieving its goal of 30,000 homes managed by the community housing sector by 2016–17.

The community housing sector is now well-established and more sustainable than it was in 2007. The department has worked collaboratively with the community housing industry to enhance the professionalism of the sector.

However, it is unclear whether the department has achieved its desired outcomes for tenants. For example, it wanted more flexible, tailored services for tenants and more resilient communities but it did not determine how it would measure these outcomes. However, tenants managed by the non-government sector are more satisfied than those in public housing managed by the department.

Contracts for managing government-owned community housing properties currently run for three years. Longer leases would make it easier for providers to obtain loans and give providers an incentive to invest in the properties they manage, which may help community housing providers to better deliver the department’s goals.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Department of Family and Community Services
crowd of people
Agency response

The Department of Family and Community Services supported the recommendations in the report.

Report release date
16 September 2015
Albert ‘Tibby’ Cotter Walkway

This audit on the Albert ‘Tibby’ Cotter Walkway found that Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) delivered the walkway to an extremely tight timeframe. It was operational for the 2015 Cricket World Cup at the Sydney Cricket Ground as promised by the government. However, the World Cup deadline added substantially to the total cost of the walkway, which was projected to be $38 million.

Transport for NSW and RMS could not provide evidence of a compelling economic or financial argument to support the construction of the walkway, or for the tight deadline. Also, the processes they adopted to provide assurance of the project’s value for money were not adequate.

Justification for the walkway and the deadline was weak and processes to ensure value for money were deficient. There was no final business case and no ‘gateway review’ as required by the government’s project assurance system.

RMS never clearly demonstrated that the walkway should be built. It also did not clarify the extra cost required to meet the World Cup deadline or demonstrate it was worth paying.

By extending an existing alliance with a highly experienced and qualified contractor, RMS accepted a cost premium to mitigate the risks associated with the tight timeframe. The deadline meant that there could be no specific competitive tendering for the walkway. It also led to the development of a ‘fall-back’ design, additional overtime and the inefficient use of equipment and temporary works. The deadline also prevented concurrent delivery with the CBD and South East Light Rail project, which RMS thought would save millions of dollars.

RMS adopted several good governance practices for management of the alliance, including keeping the alliance at arms-length and using an independent cost estimator. However, there were some shortcomings in implementation.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Transport for NSW
  • Roads and Maritime Services
road closed
Agency response

Transport for NSW and Roads and Maritime Services accepted the recommendations in the report.

Report release date
17 September 2015
Activity Based Funding Data Quality

We found that while data quality governance for Activity Based Funding is adequate, there are some areas for improvement. The key areas that NSW Health can do better in include:

  • implementing a comprehensive data quality framework which governs how Local Health Districts collect, manage and use data for Activity Based Funding
  • resolving workforce issues related to clinical coding that may impact data quality for Activity Based Funding
  • resolving issues related to the use of multiple and unaudited feeder systems by Local Health Districts that present risk to data quality.

The engagement of leadership with Activity Based Funding is an important institutional component for good data quality governance. We found that senior leaders in NSW Health are committed to Activity Based Funding and encourage its use to improve management practice. This keeps the organisation focused on data quality.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • NSW Health
returning form
Agency response
NSW Health accepted and supported all four recommendations.
Report release date
4 November 2015
Government Assistance to Industry
Mental Health Post-Discharge Care
Public Sector Management Reforms
Government Assistance to Industry

We found the Department of Industry was unable to demonstrate that assistance provided to industry was effective in achieving long term industry development objectives.

We found there was:

  • no agreed definition of industry assistance and no overarching rationale for its use
  • no comprehensive evaluation of industry assistance programs
  • insufficient reporting on industry assistance programs.

The audit examined seven programs that provide at least $2 million per year in grants and subsidies to industry.

While industry assistance programs set broader goals – largely economic – none set targets for their contribution to government strategic goals. This limited the department’s accountability for results.

The department conducted detailed cost-benefit analysis prior to providing assistance for projects over $200,000. This helped to provide some rigour. Payments were linked to milestone achievement for a number of programs. The department did not follow up to check whether benefits were sustained after industry assistance ceased.

Reporting on industry assistance programs was limited and inconsistent. High level information was published about the expected benefits of assistance programs in terms of jobs, capital investment and exports. Insufficient detail was published on those who received assistance, particularly for two of the largest programs – the Regional Industries Investment Fund and the State Investment Attraction Scheme.

Better collection, analysis and reporting will help to ensure that industry assistance is appropriately targeted and contributing to longer term objectives.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Department of Trade and Investment, Regional Infrastructure and Services
solar panels
Agency Response

The department noted that many of the report’s findings coincided with the government’s decision to replace two of the programs reviewed with the ‘Jobs for NSW’ program. The department also noted that a number of the recommendations will be of continuing value, some have already been adopted and others will continue to guide the development of future industry assistance programs.

Report Release Date
17 December 2015
Mental Health Post-Discharge Care

Discharge from hospital is a critical transition point in the delivery of mental health care. People leaving hospital after an admission for an episode of mental illness have a heightened level of vulnerability and, without adequate follow-up, may relapse or be readmitted.

We found that, overall, mental health consumers receive good follow-up in the first seven days after their discharge from mental health units. However, there is opportunity for further improvement.

The improved rate of consumers receiving follow-up care has been driven by a range of different practices across Local Health Districts, as well as by the strong commitment of clinicians and management.

There is strong understanding and awareness of the general intent of NSW Health’s transfer of care policy directive for mental health consumers, with clinicians and managers displaying commitment to ensuring that consumers receive post-discharge follow-up. However, there could be better adherence to some aspects of the policy, such as:

  • the requirement to establish an estimated discharge date when the patient is admitted
  • the need to engage consumers, as well as their families and carers, in planning for their transfer back to the community
  • the obligation to provide consumers with individual transfer of care plans tailored to their own needs and capacities.

We found areas for improvement in practices such as:

  • ensuring adequate follow-up contact and care is provided when consumers are transferred back to the community in a different Local Health District to where they had been admitted
  • the quality of communication and coordination that is needed between mental health inpatient unit staff and community mental health service staff.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • NSW Health
doctor/patient hands
Agency response

NSW Health supported the recommendations in the report.

Report release date
17 December 2015
Public Sector Management Reforms

We found the Public Service Commission (PSC) is making good progress in implementing public sector management reforms, although there are some areas for improvement.

We found that the PSC:

  • developed a sound evidence base and built support across agencies for the reforms
  • developed good guidance for government agencies to implement the reforms
  • could do more to report on the benefits of the reforms and plan for evaluation.

The PSC is leading the roll-out of reforms to work practices, employment structures and conduct of the NSW public service. These include changes to rules and guidelines for recruitment, job classification, the structure of the senior executive service, and ethical conduct.

The PSC provided agencies with adequate support and guidance to help them implement the reforms. However, it could have:

  • been more timely with guidance
  • better explained the rationale of the reforms, the links between the reforms, and the best order in which to implement the reforms.

The PSC is currently developing a performance measurement framework to better monitor and report on the impact of the reforms. While it has done a mid-point assessment of how the reforms have been implemented, it has not established a method or plan to evaluate the reforms once they are fully implemented.

The PSC developed a robust case for action in response to the Commission of Audit Interim Report. It has set high level reform objectives, but did not quantify the scale of anticipated benefits and does not actively monitor or manage their realisation.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Public Service Commission
pen and paper
Agency response

The PSC supported the report’s seven recommendations, subject to specific comments. In response to recommendations to implement the workforce measurement framework for evaluation and to increase public reporting, the PSC will put emphasis on the impact of the integrated reform package on organisational effectiveness in achieving outcomes (rather than individual reform elements).

Report release date
28 January 2016
Franchising of Sydney Ferries Network Services
Realising the Benefits of the Service NSW Initiative
Performance Frameworks in Custodial Centre Operations
Franchising of Sydney Ferries Network Services

This audit assessed whether the decision to franchise ferry services on the Sydney Ferries Network in July 2012 was justified, and whether Transport for NSW’s management of the franchise has been effective.

We found franchising ferry services to Harbour City Ferries, a private operator, has resulted in reduced contract payments in the order of 12 per cent compared to payments made to the State-owned Sydney Ferries, the operator preceding the franchise. The service performance of Harbour City Ferries against common performance indicators has been as good or better than that of Sydney Ferries.

Transport for NSW, with the support of Treasury, undertook sufficiently robust analysis to conclude franchising would lead to material cost savings, service improvements and effective risk transfer to the private sector. This included drawing on the outcomes of market testing on ferry services it conducted in 2008–09. Transport for NSW adopted a comprehensive process to select Harbour City Ferries.

The audit found that Transport for NSW’s contract with Harbour City Ferries was mostly well designed, with performance indicators largely promoting effectiveness, but there were improvement opportunities. The contract did not have performance measures for customer satisfaction or for timely travel information to customers, which are specific government objectives in ‘NSW – Making it Happen’ and the ‘NSW 2012 State Plan’.

Transport for NSW has implemented a comprehensive framework for managing the contract with Harbour City Ferries, with adequate assurance that information it has on the operator’s performance is valid and reliable. There were some minor deficiencies in procedures outlining delegations for decision making, and the measurement of the service reliability performance indicators.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Transport for NSW
ferry and Harbour Bridge
Agency response

Transport for NSW accepted most of the recommendations of the report.

Report release date
4 February 2016
Realising the Benefits of the Service NSW Initiative

Planning for the Service NSW initiative (the initiative) commenced in June 2012 with the objective to improve customer services and cost efficiency by rationalising 394 shop fronts, 8,000 phone numbers and over 800 government web pages that citizens and businesses use to access NSW Government services. In June 2013, a new organisation, Service NSW, commenced operations as the one-stop access point for NSW Government transaction services.

This audit assessed whether there was an effective benefits realisation approach to realise the anticipated benefits of the initiative.

Roads and Maritime Services, NSW Fair Trading and the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages were amongst the first user agencies to move their customer and transaction functions to Service NSW. Together they represent approximately 80 per cent of Service NSW transactions. We examined their participation in the initiative.

Service NSW is tracking the achievement of selected benefits and savings, for example, its financial performance and customer satisfaction. Service NSW provides a convenient and practical way for customers to access all government transaction services. However, agencies involved in the initiative have not adopted an effective benefits realisation approach for the initiative. This means that no one is currently monitoring whole-of-government benefits and savings, and there is insufficient data available to fully value or identify individual agency and whole-of-government savings and benefits.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Service NSW
  • Customer Service Commissioner
hand holding a cheque
Agency response

Service NSW and the Customer Service Commissioner did not accept our view that the approach to benefits management, no matter how effective, will result in the benefits of the
program actually being realised. Whilst acknowledging that effective benefits monitoring is an integral part of the program, Service NSW advised that the realisation of benefits is dependent on the success of the program, not the reporting system. It also noted that, at the time of the audit, it was very early in the life of the overall initiative.

Report release date
17 February 2016
Performance Frameworks in Custodial Centre Operations

We found that the effectiveness of Corrective Services NSW’s (CSNSW) performance framework is limited because organisational key performance indicators (KPIs) do not cascade to the public correctional centre level.

CSNSW’s performance framework specifies organisational KPIs, for which most have targets. However, CSNSW did not specify KPIs or benchmarks for individual public correctional centres. As a result, CSNSW could not assess the performance of these centres. CSNSW’s commissioning and contestability project is designed to address this issue.

In 2014–15, CSNSW met five of 12 organisational targets. Targets that were not met include nil prisoner-on-prisoner assaults and eight hours’ time out of cells for inmates in secure facilities. CSNSW advised that these targets reflect government policy and can be difficult to consistently achieve in a high-risk corrective services environment.

Operating standards were set for public correctional centres. Most of these standards were met. Performance Linked Fees (PLFs) and operating specifications were set for private correctional centres. All but one PLF and one operating specification was met in the 2014–15 contract year.

CSNSW put processes in place to set and manage actions in response to variations in performance against operating standards, private correctional centre PLFs and specifications.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Department of Justice
  • Corrective Services NSW
prison officer
Agency response

The Department of Justice noted the constructive suggestions made in the report to improve overall system accountability and undertook to carefully consider the report’s recommendations.

Report release date
3 March 2016
Managing Unsolicited Proposals in New South Wales
Reintegrating Young People into the Community after Detention
Supporting Students with Disability in NSW Public Schools
Managing Unsolicited Proposals in New South Wales

We found that the governance arrangements for unsolicited proposals made to NSW Government are adequate. However, there needs to be greater transparency and public reporting on unsolicited proposals received by government.

The Department of Premier and Cabinet (DPC) effectively coordinates unsolicited proposals through its published guide, as well as through the support and advice it provides to agencies and proponents. The guide is clear and comprehensive. Agencies most commonly approached about unsolicited proposals have a good understanding of the process, but this could be improved across the NSW Government as a whole. There is ambiguity regarding the nature of DPC’s oversight role. The unsolicited proposals process would be more transparent and engender greater community confidence by more public reporting about the proposals.

Governance arrangements support the separation of the assessment and approval of unsolicited proposals. This includes the broad arrangements set out in the guide itself, as well as those arrangements that are established through governance plans that are mandated by the guide for proposals that reach Stage Two (the detailed proposal stage) of the assessment process. There is a lack of clarity about what regard government will give other relevant procurement processes and approval requirements when forming governance arrangements for unsolicited proposals.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Department of Premier and Cabinet
reading a report
Agency response

The Department of Premier and Cabinet indicated it will work towards implementation of the majority of recommendations in the report.

Report release date
10 March 2016
Reintegrating Young People into the Community after Detention

Juvenile Justice NSW prepares and assists young people to reintegrate into the community reasonably well. It has many good processes and programs in place to identify and address young people’s needs while in detention and link them to relevant support services in the community. However, it still faces significant challenges which make reintegration difficult. Some of these are within its control to fix, such as strengthening discharge planning. Others relate to external factors, such as engagement with other organisations in the community.

Young people can access programs to help address their offending behaviours. However, completion rates vary. Juvenile Justice NSW is reviewing these programs to ensure they are delivered in ways that engage young people and are evidence-based. Juvenile Justice NSW should also clarify what it wants to achieve regarding recreation activities and vocational training, and ensure its programs align with these outcomes. Staff within centres were also uncertain about the effect of recent changes in the vocational education sector on the availability of training courses.

The proportion of young people being referred to services in the community after release has increased over the last five years. However, access to services can be difficult to arrange, particularly mental health, drug and alcohol, and housing. This is partly due to the complex needs of these young people and the limited capacity of other organisations in the community.

We found that while most young people leaving Juvenile Justice NSW’s care have somewhere to live, less than half are working, training, or going to school. Reoffending rates have been relatively stable over the last ten years, with around one in two young people leaving detention reoffending within one year of leaving Juvenile Justice NSW’s care.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Department of Justice
  • Juvenile Justice NSW
columns
Agency response

The department supported the recommendations in the report.

Report release date
28 April 2016
Supporting Students with Disability in NSW Public Schools

The Department of Education is doing a reasonable job in managing how well students with disability transition to a new school and in supporting teachers to improve these students’ educational outcomes. In recent years, it has put considerable effort into improving support for students with disability. Initiatives include more teacher training, specialist learning and support teachers in schools, and increased disability funding for schools.

However, the level of support provided to students with disability can vary. Some schools support students well, while others have more to do before they adequately meet students’ needs. This is partly due to cultural resistance in schools, and the lack of expertise of some teachers, regarding disability.

The department has good processes in place to help teachers identify the needs of students with disability when they transition to a new school. We also found many examples of teachers adjusting support to meet the needs of individual students. However, some barriers remain, including limited time to plan for adjustments and poor understanding by some teachers of their obligations under the disability standards and how to support a student with disability.

While schools collect information on individual students, the department is not yet able determine overall school performance in improving learning outcomes for students with disability. Schools should also provide clearer information for parents on the support available at their local school and consult more with families on what is being done to address their child’s needs.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Department of Education
students writing
Agency response

The department was broadly supportive of recommendations in the report.

Report release date
12 May 2016
Early Childhood Education

 
 
Early Childhood Education

The NSW Government wants all children to have access to quality early childhood education in their year before school.

Enrolments in quality early childhood education programs in New South Wales are increasing but are below the national benchmark. While 99 per cent of children in the year before school were enrolled in education programs in 2015, only 77 per cent were enrolled for at least 600 hours. New South Wales performance on the 600 hour benchmark lags behind other States and Territories. Fees for families in New South Wales are higher, and the NSW Government’s contribution per child is lower, than in most other States and Territories.

Community preschool subsidies are now better targeted. However, funding for education in long day care is limited and not targeted to disadvantaged children. Government preschools remain relatively expensive and not always located where needed. Also, subsidies are not tied to the government’s 600 hour benchmark.

Failure to achieve performance benchmarks cost New South Wales $68 million in Australian Government financial support between 2013–14 and 2014–15.

National arrangements governing regulation of early childhood education and care are complex, resource intensive and constrain efficient regulation. The department has had some success in achieving reform at the national level. Within the constraints of the national arrangements, the department has been reviewing its regulatory processes and implementing improvements to enhance efficiency.

Elapsed time for completing approvals and assessment and ratings has fallen (improved) coinciding with implementation of process improvements. However, the department does not collect data on the costs of its various regulatory activities. Therefore, it is not able to prove it is providing regulatory services at an efficient cost.

To view the full report click here.

Agencies audited
  • Department of Education
small girl
Agency response

The department supported the recommendations in the report.

Report release date
26 May 2016

The year ahead for performance audit

Section 38B of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1983 provides the Auditor-General of New South Wales with a mandate to undertake performance audits in NSW Government agencies.

Our audit topics for the coming three years have been developed taking into account the Premier’s priorities and State priorities set out in ‘NSW – Making It Happen’. The proposed performance audit program covers the activities of the ten clusters responsible for delivering the government’s priorities. The program has been informed by consultation with key stakeholders, including NSW Parliament’s Public Accounts Committee, department secretaries, and the integrity agencies.

When examining agency performance we expect to refer to some broad themes that are relevant to today’s government administration and reform: governance, devolution, partnerships, outsourcing, efficient service delivery and transparency.

The following schedule identifies the audit program for the 2016–17 financial year (subject to any emerging priorities). Our programs for 2017–18 and 2018–19 are on our website, but we expect these will change as we undertake annual reviews and consultation.

Proposed topics for 2016–17

Proposed topics for 2016–17Agency cluster
Government advertisingPremier and Cabinet
Red tape reductionPremier and Cabinet / Finance, Services and Innovation
Implementation of the government’s Program Evaluation FrameworkTreasury / Premier and Cabinet / Industry and Skills / Planning and Environment / Police and Justice
Delivering major projects – NorthConnexTransport / Treasury
Procurement – contingent workforceFinance, Services and Innovation
Planning for school infrastructureEducation
Use of IT to improve education outcomes and productivityEducation
National Disability Insurance Scheme – Ensuring readiness and capability of non-government sectorFamily and Community Services
Asset management in HealthHealth
Palliative careHealth
Ensuring food retail businesses comply with food safety standardsIndustry and Skills
Sale and lease of Crown landIndustry and Skills
Mining rehabilitation security depositsIndustry and Skills
Planning Assessment Commission determinationsPlanning and Environment
Management of injured workersPolice and Justice
Support programs and services in prisonsPolice and Justice
Sydney CBD and South East light rail Transport
Getting rail passengers to their destinations on timeTransport

For further information on these audits, see our three-year performance audit program.